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Vintage Game Used and/or Game Worn Hockey Memorabilia
Guyle Fielder, 1972-73 Game Worn, Game Used Jersey
Guyle Fielders Portland Buckaroos Jersey
This jersey was worn by the great Guyle Fielder in his final two seasons in the Western Hockey League (1971-73) while with the Portland Buckaroos. Guyle was a Super Star in the Western Hockey League and racked up a total of 1929 points in his hockey career which is the all-time Minor League record. Fielder played in the Western Hockey League for 21 years!

During that time he lead the league seven times in total points and ten of those campaigns he was the top assist man. By the time he retired in 1973 at age 42, he had accumulated six Leader Cups as the Western Hockey league's Most Valuable Player in 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960 (co-winner w/Hank Bassen), 1964 and 1967. He also won the Fred J. Hume Cup for Most Gentlemanly Player in 1966, 1967 and 1969 and was a First-Team All-Star in 1954, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1967. However, his crowning accomplishment must have been leading the Totems to three Lester Patrick Cup Championships during his 15 seasons with them.
Andy "The Glasgow Gobbler" Aitkenhead, 1936-37 Game Worn/Game Used Jersey
Andy Aitkenhead game used jersey front Andy Aitkenhead game used jersey rear Andy Aitkenhead game used jersey crest Andy Aitkenhead game used jersey sleeve logo
This jersey was worn by the great Andy Aitkenhead who was a star for the Portland Buckaroos in the 1930's and also backstopped the New York Rangers to victory in the Stanley Cup in 1932-33. Andy wore this jersey at least during the 1936-37 season when the Portland Buckaroos were champions of the Pacific Coast Hockey League. He may have worn it in the prior season, however I do not know that for sure. This jersey came directly from Andy's widow, Violet Aitkenhead, who stated that Andy worn it during the 1936-37 season. I also have seen a photo of the team in a local restaurant and this is the jersey that Andy is wearing in the photo (complete with the holes in the lower front).

This jersey will also be featured (along with much of the other memorabilia) in my upcoming book titled "Hockey in Portland" that will be published by Arcadia Publishing next year.
Tommy McVie or Gerry Goyer, Game Worn/Game Used Jersey
Portland Buckaroos hockey jersey, Number 19 Portland Buckaroos hockey jersey, Number 19
This jersey was worn by either Gerry Goyer or Tommy McVie. I cannot state for sure which one of them wore it as many of the jerseys were passed from player to player and re-used season after season. It was manufactured by Oregon Athletic Equipment Co. who was the manufacturer of jerseys for the Buckaroos for the entire time the team existed (to the best of my knowledge). This jersey has many seen a lot of action and it has many team repairs and puck marks all over it.
Jim "Money Man" McLeod, Game Used Hockey Mask
JIm McLeod's goalie mask, front shot Jim McLeod's goalie mask , inside shot Jim McLeod's goalie mask, letter of authenticity
This mask was personally presented to me by Jim "Money Man" McLeod on 08/30/2006 in Portland Oregon. We visited over breakfast that morning at the Park City Pub in Portland. The nice surprise that day was that Jim's brother Don McLeod was visiting from Victoria and he also played in the Western Hockey League, so I got to meet another player from the old WHL. They were both very kind and answered all my questions while also sprinkling in great stories about their days as hockey players. Jim autographed his mask inside for me as well and then authenticated in writing for me that he had worn this mask from 1969 until 1976.

Here is the story behind his mask. Jim broke into the Western Hockey League with the Seattle Totems in 1961 and did not wore a mask until 1969. Harry Glickman insisted sometime in the summer of 1969 Jim was to wear a mask as the # 1 goalie for the Buckaroos. So, just like Dave, he was told by Harry Glickman to contact a guy by the name of Corkey Stickell in Northeast Portland who could make a mask for him. Jim went over to Corkey's house and Corkey made the mask you see above for Jim. Jim wore this mask from 1969 until 1976 while playing for the Portland Buckaroos, St Louis Blues, Chicago Cougars, New York Golden Blades, Los Angeles Sharks and Michigan Stags. I did ask Jim why the mask was painted yellow and he stated that it was painted that color when he joined the Michigan Stags for the 1974-75 season. Otherwise he said that up until that time (as far as he could remember) it had never been painted and it was just the original fiberglass color that it had been since the day Corkey had made it for him.
Dave "The Snake" Kelly, Game Used Hockey Mask Collection
Dave Kelly's goalie mask box, image #1 Dave Kelly goalie mask box, image #2
Dave Kelly's goalie mask box, image #3 Dave Kelly goalie mask box, image #4
Dave Kelly's William Burchmore pretzel mask, front shot Dave Kelly's William Burchmore pretzel mask , inside shot
Dave Kelly's prototype goalie mask, made by Corkey Stickell, front shot Dave Kelly's prototype goalie mask, made by Corkey Stickell, inside shot
Dave Kelly's 1st goalie mask, made by Corkey Stickell, front shot Dave Kelly's 1st goalie mask, made by Corkey Stickell, inside shot
Dave Kelly's 2nd goalie mask, made by Corkey Stickell, front shot Dave Kelly's 2nd goalie mask, made by Corkey Stickell, inside shot
These masks were personally presented to me by Dave "The Snake" Kelly on 09/01/2006 in Portland Oregon. Earlier in the day, over lunch, Dave had answered all my questions about his career in the WHL, told me many great stories about the good times with his team mates and also autographed a number of items for me as well. We finished lunch and I drove Dave back to his car at the Country Club were we first had met. Once we got to the car, he reminded me that he had brought along a few items from his playing days for me. So, you can image my surprise when he opened the trunk of his car and pulled out the wooden box you see above along with a number of important trophies that he received during his playing career. (You can view his trophies on my Vintage Hockey Trophy page, which includes his 1964 WHL Rookie of the Year trophy and his trophy for the longest Shutout streak in WHL history at 235 minutes and 22 seconds). Dave then explained that this was his "mask box" and that either Corkey Stickell, the mask maker or Harry Glickman, the Buckaroos Owner and General Manager had made the box for him. He explained that he had the box made since he originally would take his mask (or masks) and wrap them in a towel and shove them into his goalie pants in his equipment bag. However, after watching the airline baggage handlers throw the stuff around, Dave decided that he needed a better way to protect his masks, since they were vital to him. So, the box was made to store his masks in.

Here is the story behind these masks. Dave broke into the Western Hockey League as a 20-year old rookie (he was the youngest goaltender in professional hockey at that time) and he was one of the first goalies in the WHL to wear a mask. He originally had a Lefty Wilson mask which was made for him by Lefty Wilson, however it was damaged during a game. So, when he needed a new one made he contacted William Burchmore in Montreal who at that time was making the pretzel style mask that NHL great Jacques Plante was wearing. That is were Dave got his pretzel mask (see above, row # 3). However, it was a long and complicated process to get a mask made by William Burchmore since Dave was playing for the Buckaroos in Portland, Oregon and Burchmore was in Montreal. So, when it came time for Dave to get his next mask, he was told by Harry Glickman to contact a guy by the name of Corkey Stickell in Northeast Portland who could make a mask for him. So, Dave went over to Corkey's house and Corkey attempted to replicate the pretzel mask that Dave had been wearing. The process of making a mask was a complex, dirty and at times claustrophobic, Dave said. He said that in order to make the mask a layer of vasoline was first applied to their face, then layers of plaster were put over the face. The worst part of the mask-making process Dave said was when Corkey covered his nose with the plaster and you had to breathe thru straws which were stuck up your nose. Well, he said it was not a pleasant experience having to lay like that while the plaster hardened but it was the only way to get a mask made in those days. A few days later Dave went back to see how the mask turned out and he stated that he was horrified at the mask Corkey had made. As you may be able to tell, the white painted prototype (see above, row # 4) Corkey made was crude and had a number of imperfections in the fiberglass. Dave stated to Corkey emphatically that there was no way he was going to wear that mask. So, Corkey went back to work and soon came up with Dave's 1st red fiberglass mask (see above, row # 5) which he wore for a number of years with the Buckaroos. Several years later Dave went back to Corkey after his first mask was damaged and he had Corkey make him a new mask. Corkey by now was making masks for other goal tenders and had become much better at the art of mask making. The new mask Corkey made for Dave was slightly revised by making it more form fitting and also by enclosing the cheekbone area to provide more protection (see above, row # 6). Dave again wore this mask for a number of years before late in his career switching to a larger wrap-around fiberglass mask that many of the other goalies in the NHL and WHA were wearing at the time.
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